•   over 7 years ago

Software that protects you from robocalls

We have been developing software that protects from robocalls, telemarketers and other unwanted callers since 2003. It's called PhoneTray and you can find it at www.phonetray.com. It's similar to many proposed solutions but it's already in use by many thousands of users worldwide. Unfortunately we are based in Canada so we couldn't participate in the challenge.

  • 9 comments

  •   •   over 7 years ago

    Your solution does not meet the requirements because you must not impede legal permitted robocalls. We are looking for a partner on our RoboCall System which is carrier-based and filters our illegal robocalls by having legal callers register in our database. When anyone calls the system looks to see if they are registered, if not a simple test is performed to determine if the caller is live. Our system meets the FTC requirements fully in that it blocks all unregistered robocalls and allows registered and normal calls through all without the subscriber having to do anything but pay. Also works on any phone. We are looking for a partner.

  •   •   over 7 years ago

    CallClerk ( www.callclerk.com ) is another windows based program that blocks nuisance callers. It supports white listing, black listing, and even blocking of nuisance callers based on community feedback with the help of www.whocalled.us. I wrote this program myself and am also a Canadian, so sadly I can't enter this contest either. With respect to a white list of 'allowed callers' I could likely add this easily if I knew where I could get ongoing and dependable free access to a public domain list of registered numbers. If you know where I can get this, please reply to this post and let me know.

  •   •   over 7 years ago

    Steve P,
    Are you sure your system meets FTC requirement? Somehow, I doubt a carrier based will work for international calls, say for example government entities calling each other, unless the international caller's carrier supports the system, which we know is highly unusual. On the other hand, the system that I proposed may be similar to yours in that it relies on the carrier to submit authentication codes, but can work worldwide because it uses a centralized system for verification, regardless of who the carrier is.

    Rob L,
    Unless your system can validate a number has not been spoofed, then it would not work. There are tons of numbers available for the robocallers to use but they don't even have to choose from those, they can just choose from any valid business number, say for example yours, and you won't be able to black list it. If you do, well, you simply won't be able to call your customers either. :)

  •   •   over 7 years ago

    Yes. Any entity that is legally permitted will be registered with FTC. Our system is central and patented since 2002. Please read how ours works. If you want to drop me a line at steve.price@ieee.org and then we can chat.

  •   •   over 7 years ago

    Where do I go to read more about this system of yours? It doesn't appear you entered it in the competition? Perhaps the concept is exactly the same as mine, except the way it works is different. If you've patent it since 2002, then it's been 11 years, I'm wondering why it didn't catch on? Is the cost of implementation too high? I can't imagine making subscribers pay though, unless there are more benefits.

  •   •   over 7 years ago

    http://robocall.challenge.gov/submissions/13359-an-easy-to-implement-solution-that-meets-all-ftc-requirements-and-is?utm_campaign=ftc-robocall-challenge_20121001&utm_medium=email&utm_source=transactional

    The patent is for the caller registration and screening system. The robocall system just matches their requirements. The key part is the sharable database which is covered by our patent.

  •   •   over 7 years ago

    Interesting, your solution is indeed similar to mine in concept, except I can see it works a entirely different. It doesn't require the level of complexity your solution proposes but it requires more user involvement too. On the bright side, it also has many more features.

    One thing about your solution I do not understand though, who is this subscriber who has to pay? The receiving party or the calling party? I doubt the receiving party will want to pay and the calling party may see no reason to participate unless there's some kind of law that requires them to, which I highly doubt will pass. Moreover, I doubt the international parties will be happy about it either.

  •   •   over 7 years ago

    Subscriber pays of course or the carrier can to make their service more attractive. people will pay for peace.

  •   •   over 7 years ago

    If by subscriber you mean both receiving and calling party, then it's highly unlikely either party will participate. You may have a great solution but hampered by a poor business model.

    Another thing, my solution uses the same existing caller ID technology and I'm hearing some say it doesn't pass the part about the existing switches so I'm wondering how much more complex it would be to add voice print or biometric method to it.

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