•   about 8 years ago

Is it even possible to have a solution to this problem?

If calls generated from these low life's can come across without any caller id information, or spoofed caller id, how is it even possible to determine where these calls are originated from in order to even block them?? Seems like an impossible problem to solve, almost like the problem with email spam.

  • 10 comments

  •   •   about 8 years ago

    Seems like the only viable solution has to be on the telco side where they agree to block designated calls, since they would be the only ones to know the real caller id.

  •   •   about 8 years ago

    Telcos do not know the real caller ID. The only thing they know is the ingres trunk where they received the call from. … of course only if the robocaller is calling from within the telecoms own switchgear.
    We must consider that inbound trunks can assert any caller-ID. Besides the user-provided ID even the network provided ID can be zero for foreign inbound calls. Telcos have the obligation that these calls must be delivered.

  •   •   about 8 years ago

    Ok, so if telcos do not even know the real caller ID, then how in the world are we supposed to develop a solution that blocks calls that need a caller id for it to even work?? I'm assuming that this "solution" we are supposed to be developer is on the consumer side, like some sort of device. So if there is no call id available, what is this device supposed to work with??

  •   •   about 8 years ago

    True and I guess that we are lying to each other if we want to provide a cure for existing PSTN and mobile networks that rely on Trust-By-Wire.

    The only thing left is speech recognition at the terminating end and a white-list with some puzzle at the entry door/endpoint. You can not trust the terminating phone company since they must believe what they get ;-(

  •   •   about 8 years ago

    Its already solved but the phone companies make money from these robocalls. IT WILL NEVER STOP ONLY BECAUSE THEY REALLY DONT WANT IT TO STOP. just dont pay your bill and hit them in their pockets. If we all do this, then it will stop. people power!!!

  •   •   about 8 years ago

    right in parts to some extents only.

    The merits of the telecom act of 1996 with unbundling obligations made it very simple for new operators to leverage the weakness of technology as well. In consequence, they can not really stop it anymore since the formerly closed network has become vulnerable. In fact, the formerly closed network has many new entries that allow anyone to route along virtually untraceable routes.
    - Trust-By-Wire" is history for SS7 networks ;-(
    - Trust-By-Authentication is not supported throughout PSTN / SS7 systems.

    Telcos must stick to statistic call patterns or malicious call tracing which is a tedious manual process with holding connections until the whole path is identified :-(

    So it is not all about money and customer choice only and we need to find a smart way around this issues.

  •   •   about 8 years ago

    I also have a solution that I am preparing to submit. It's simple, inexpensive and is a real solution. Someone stated earlier, that the FTC already has the solution, that may be correct; I am just an average person, who want to see if my imagination and spark idea, rank up there with the big dogs.

  •   •   almost 8 years ago

    The technical solution needs to lie within the land-line's networks, if they can't trace the originating call to somewhere, then they're screwed.

    However these people doing robocalls are obviously succeeding, so it shouldn't be hard on the other end to prosecute them after a successful transaction leading them to where the money is.

  •   •   almost 8 years ago

    this will definitely take some ingenuity and then it's only a matter of time before the scammers find a way to bypass it ;this will pretty much be cat and mouse indefinitely. To remedy something of this scale all telco's will have to be involved for sure and the court systems. The next issue is voip and the ability to buy your own PBX or download software like Xlite to spoof your number to oblivion What the answer is , I don't know, but I Think that changing penalties for crimes like this from civil to criminal would be a good start. Lets face it , POTS is nearly dead and the focus should be targeted at voip as that's where it's going to turn to fully, if it's not already there..

  •   •   almost 8 years ago

    You have a old system thats been upgraded for capacity that simply cannot be adapted without expensive modifications to accommodate security features to block robocallers. If you think outside the box, there are numerous solutions to this issue. And no, i'm not referring to a App, CID Blacklist or Special number you dial after being the victim of a robocall., lol

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